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How to Tie a Fishing Knot — An Expert Guide

How to Tie a Fishing Knot — An Expert Guide
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Let’s face it — fishing without a good knowledge of how to tie a fishing knot can make the entire fishing experience frustrating.

For starters, there are different types of fishing knots. For instance, the knot used in tying a fishing line to a hook differs from the knots used in joining two sections of a line together.

In other words, different situations call for different knots. And in order to be prepared for anything, you could learn how to tie the different kinds of fishing knots that there are including the improved clinch, Palomar knot, the blood knot, double surgeon’s loop, wireline to mono knot, snell knot, and the tucked sheet bend knot.

You get to learn all about these knots and more in this article; with detailed tutorial videos on how to tie them.

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Types of Fishing Knots and How to Tie Them

Improved Clinch Knot

This knot is useful when you want to tie a line to a hook.

To tie this knot, thread the line through the hook and then wrap it around the line five to seven times with the loose end. Thread the loose end of the line through the loop closest to the eye of the hook and then thread it back around inside the loose section of the line. Then, tighten both ends of the line and trim the loose end of the line.

The improved clinch knot can also be used on monofilament lines. It is quick, reliable and very easy to tie.

Check out this video to learn how to tie the improved clinch knot:

Palomar Knot

The Palomar knot is used to tie a fishing line to a hook.

To tie this knot, double the line first to enable you to make a hoop. Then, push the loop through the eye of the hook and make a loose overhand knot. Take the loop and pass it around the end of the hook and pull on the line to make it tight. Lastly, you can now trim the excess loose end of the line.

The Palomar knots are effective for fishing lines that are up to the 20-pound test. They have a strength of ninety-five percent and are also very easy to tie. It can get tangled because it is usually double-run through the hook and then looped over the hook but it is a very effective knot.

The Palomar knot works well with monofilament lines and braid lines.

This video provides more insight on how to tie a Palomar knot. Check it out!

Blood Knot

The blood knot is used to join two sections of a line together.

To tie this knot, line up the ends of each line together and then wrap the first line around the second line at least five times. Do the same thing to the second line, wrap it around the first line at least five times and take both loose ends to the middle between the two lines. Tighten each line until the knot is fit.

It is called the blood knot because a version of it was used in the early days. It used to be tied at the ends of whips in order to draw blood.

Learn how to tie the blood knot in this video:

Double Surgeon’s Loop

The double surgeon loop is used to form a loop at the end of a line.

To tie this knot, fold the end of the line over to make a double line and tie a single overhand knot. Then, take the loop and pass it through the hole one more time in the overhand knot. Dampen the knot and make it tight.

The double surgeon’s knot is very useful when joining two lines with unequal sizes, like a tippet to a leader. It was called a double overhand knot which was later renamed ‘double surgeon’s knot.’

Wireline to Mono Knot

The wireline to mono knot is used to attach wireline to monofilament.

To tie this knot, fold four inches of wireline backward over itself to form a bend at the end of the line. Take your monofilament line and run it through the middle of the bend. Wrap it once around the bottom of the bend, and then pass the loose end of the monofilament over the center strand of the monofilament and under the wireline. Pull it till it fits.

Snell Knot

Snelling a hook is used for attaching the monofilament to a hook.

To tie this knot, pass the end of the line through the hook two times, this process will create a loop hanging alongside the hook. Take the loop and wrap it around the hook five to ten times, forming tight coils. Hold the coils in one finger and pull the line up until the loop is fit under the coils.

The snell knot may be tied with braid, fluorocarbon, or monofilament line. This knot does not come loose easily. It stays in line with the hook’s shank which makes it strong and makes it easier to obtain a good hook set.

Just as we have types of fishing knots, we also have types of Snell knots. They are easy snell knot, uni-snell knot, double hook snell knot, sliding snell hook knot, egg loop knot, improved snell knot, nail snell knot.

Tucked Sheet Bend Knot

The tucked sheet bend is used to attach a line to a leader loop or a snelled hook to the line.

To tie this knot, pass the end of the line through the loop and make a sheet bend knot. Then, pass the end of the line through the loop of the sheet bend and make it tight until it fits.

The tucked sheet bend knot is also known as the one-way sheet bend. It is very useful in terms of joining lines that might be hauled over an object. 

Turle Knot

The turle knot is used for tying tin line to a small hook.

To tie this knot, take the line and run it through the hook and tie a loose double overhand knot at the end of the line. Take the open-loop and pass it over the hook. Make sure it fits so the loop tightens around the hook.

The turle knot is one of the best in terms of attaching flies to the tippet or leader. It makes dead flies tied on it look very real beneath the surface of the water because of the way the knot allows the leader to moderately pull away from the hook.

Dropper Knot

The dropper loop knot is one of the popular knots in which baits, jigs, and flies are usually attached to their fishing line. When using the dropper knot, try not to make too many loops to prevent tangling.

To tie this knot, form a loop using your fishing line. Take one end of the loop and wrap it six or more times around itself. Put your finger at the middle opening.

Take the original loops and put it through the middle opening, then hold the original loop with your teeth and moisten the knot with your saliva. Gently pull both ends of the line in their opposite directions.

Check out this video to learn how to tie the dropper loop knot:

Stopper Knot

The stopper knot is used mainly when fishing with slip floats. It is tied on the mainline above the sliding slip float.

To tie this knot, estimate at least six inches of the fishing line. Tie the stopper equal to the fishing line and double back to create a loop. Begin wrapping three to four times around both lines passing through the open loop, each time. Pull both ends of the stopper in the opposite directions until they are fit. Trim the excess loose ends.

This video provides a detailed tutorial on how to tie this knot. Check it out.

Double Uni Knot

The double uni knot is used in joining two lines.

To tie this knot, overlap the tag ends of the lined to be joined. Use one end of the line from either left or right to create a loop over the overlapped line by laying the tag end and wrap about three to four times around both lines passing through the loop.

Slowly pull both ends of the lines until they become tight. Now that you have tied two uni knots, pull the standing lines carefully to help join the two knots together and trim the excess loose ends.

Learn more from this video:

Hangman’s Knot

The hangman’s knot, also known as the Uni knot, is very easy to tie.

To tie this knot, thread the line into the hook and double back making it equal to the standing line. Then, create a loop over the doubled line by laying the tag end. Wrap about seven to eight times with the tag end line around the double line passing through the loop.

Moisten the lines and pull the tag end until the knot is perfectly tightened. Carefully adjust the knot by sliding it down the hook or you could leave a small loop if you want. Trim the excess loose end.

Check out this detailed tutorial video to learn more.

Surgeon’s Knot

The surgeon’s knot is used to join two sections of a fishing line together.

To tie this knot, lay the lines so they overlap each other by a few inches. Tie an overhand knot to enable you to create a simple loop for the lines to work as one. Slowly pass the tag end and the leader twice through the loop you created. Moisten the knot and carefully pull all the four ends till they fit.

Watch this video for a visual tutorial on how to tie the surgeon’s knot:

What is the Strongest Knot for Fishing?

Many fishermen believe that the Palomar knot is the strongest knot for fishing. When it is tied properly, it comes close to a hundred percent.

When tying a Palomar knot, be sure that all parts of the knot cinch up together when the hook or lure passes through the loop.  

When the loop part of the knot goes up against the bottom of the eye of the hook or lure, the knot may not fulfill its purpose.

The Palomar knot is also the best knot to use with braided fishing line. It is quite durable and a very good choice.

Photo by VisionPic .net from Pexels

Tips for Tying a Fishing Knot

i. Choose the right fishing knot and ensure you tie it properly.

ii. Add moisture to the knots before making it snug; you could use water.

iii. Make sure the knots you’re tying are properly tightened.

iv. Trim the excess loose ends of the fishing lines.

v. Practicing how to tie fishing knots often will make you better at it.

Conclusion

Fishing knots are made and used almost every day in some parts of the world. They come in different kinds and each performs different functions, from joining a line to a hook to connecting two sections of a line.

You do not have to practice tying all of these knots. Choose some and be consistent in your practice. Before you know it, you can become a pro sooner than you imagined!

Photo by Brett Sayles from Pexels

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